Category Archives: it’s weird

Our Galaxy is a Seed that Will Eventually Grow into it’s Own Universe

The universe is accelerating away from the center of the Big Bang.

The universe is cooling down, because galaxies are moving away from each other.
The number of stars in the sky will diminish over time, there will eventually be a few, then there will be none. This is the current theory (paraphrased) held by many scientists today, typically referred to as heat death.

I’m no scientist, but I like to visualize.  Read this article: Speculative Sunday: Can a Black Hole Explode?

I was inspired, in particular by this image:

This artist’s impression shows the remains of a star that came too close to a supermassive black hole. Extremely sharp observations of the event Swift J1644+57 with the radio telescope network EVN (European VLBI Network) have revealed a remarkably compact jet, shown here in yellow. – ESA/S. Komossa/Beabudai Design

 

The above image is an artists rendition of the results of the data received from an “earth-sized radio telescope”. The detail is specific, even if interpreted. What I’m seeing here is a pattern. Spiral falling / contraction (gravity), with a projection of stuff out the north and south poles. This projection from the black hole is likely directly related to the consumption of the star, which we see visualised as the star being smeared in a spiral around the singularity.

This is the pattern. Gravity pulls things in on one “plane” and creates a jet stream at the north and south poles of the black hole.  The jet stream is comprised of particles of matter that have been deflected or have narrowly escaped being captured by the black whole, only to be accelerated away at high speed again.   Now this particular aspect of how black holes function is very interesting because the process heats up space, to the point where it could potentially create or influence the creation of stars within a galaxy.  Think about that for a moment.

To create a star, or star-system, you don’t need THE Big Bang.  You don’t need super-galaxies, or galaxies or star-systems.  What you need is a black hole.  Every star that dies turns into a black hole (or a neutron star, then a black hole).You just need a black hole to create a star, and planets, and there I suggest, life?

My hypothesis is this.  Even if all our galaxies are moving away from each other over billions of years, and even though light and heat will diminish – new stars, new galaxies, and new universes will be created, just as the “first” one was.  And this dimension will continue on for other new life forms to grow and learn and figure this all out all over again.

Watch Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey if you have no idea what I’m talking about, then come back to this article.

http://www.space.com/18893-black-hole-jets-similarities.html
http://www.thephysicsmill.com/2015/06/14/speculative-sunday-can-a-black-hole-explode/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutron_star

Note: After writing this, I read up on Hawking Radiation, and found that black holes do die if they don’t feed (on other stars), they will eventually evaporate.  This is kind of poetic.

Bad advice on “free advice”

Cross-post from LinkedIn, in response to How Seeking ‘Free’ Works Against Our Career Success:

I cannot completely agree here. There are many who offer free advice that also happens to be good advice. Alternatively, it is important for advice seekers to learn how to distinguish between good and bad advice by learning to think critically about the information they are receiving – by asking deeper, probing questions. Every answer received should lead to further questions. While I do agree that it is important to learn how to be independent and make your own way in this world (as in the example of parents encouraging children to pay for their own education), I do not see how this directly relates to giving or receiving free advice, or how free advice (as suggested in this article) can be considered to be bad advice without further inquiry. With regard to the job seeker asking for his/her resume to be reviewed, that was simply a lazy request. You cannot help those who are not willing to put in the effort to help themselves, regardless of whether or not your advice is free.

My Fun With Necrolinguaphilia

Last night I attended a talk given by Dr. Damian Conway (of Perl Best Practices fame) titled “Fun With Dead Languages“.  Although this is a talk that Damian had given previously, it is the first time that I heard it, and I’m so glad I did!

I was the first to arrive at the Mozilla office building at 366 Adelaide, and so was able to score a sweet parking spot right across the street (no small feat in downtown Toronto).

I arrived and introduced myself to Damian as he was preparing for his delivery shortly before a herd of approximately 70 hackers (according to Mozilla) from all language and computing backgrounds started pouring through the meeting room doors to be seated.

Damian has a very energetic style of presentation, and was able to hold our attention while covering everything from the virtual extinction of the Gros Michel Banana, to the benefits and efficiencies of stack-based programming (using PostScript as an example).  He compares many, very different languages including Befunge, Brainfuck, Lisp, and Piet, and suggests that a great place to look for new ideas is what he calls the “Language Morgue”, where he includes languages such as Awk, Prolog, Cobol… and even C++ as examples of dead languages and language paradigms.

Mr. Conway also dived into excruciating detail on how the Latin natural language can be used as an effective computer programming language, and has even gone so far as to write a module called Lingua::Romana::Perligata, which he has made available on the CPAN.

I also had the special treat of sitting right behind Sacha Chua who brilliantly sketched notes of the entire talk in real-time.  I haven’t had the pleasure of formally meeting Sacha just yet (didn’t even say “hello”, my bad!) as I didn’t want to distract her.  Aside from having my mind blown by Damian’s talk, I was also being mesmerized by Sacha’s artistic skills, and so I do feel somewhat justified in keeping my mouth shut just to absorb everything that was going on right in front of me (front-row seats FTW!).

20130806 Fun with Dead Languages - Damian Conway

Sacha has made her “Fun With Dead Languages” sketch notes publicly available on her blog for everyone to review and enjoy, and has placed it under a Creative Commons license, so please share freely (and drop her a note to say “thanks!”).

Overall, I learned a lot from this this talk and appreciate it immensely.  The energy of the audience made the discussion that much more enjoyable.  If you are interested in programming languages or language theory in general, I suggest you attend this talk the next time Damian decides to deliver it (or find a recording if one happens to be available?).  Damian Conway’s insights and humorous delivery are well worth the brainfuck ;)

Maybe Big Brother Isn’t As Bad as You Think..

Cross-post from LinkedIn, in response to Maybe Big Brother Isn’t As Bad as You Think:

“This is a future Orwell could not have predicted. And Big Brother may turn out to be a pretty nice guy.” I respectfully disagree. As others have noted, there is (and always will be) a huge asymmetry in the information being shared and consumed as far as “Big Brother” and state surveillance is concerned. The “sharing” in this case is one-way. Only those in power would have the ability to view and make sense of the data.

Your argument that we “choose to share data” because we get something in return, is flawed. Most people do not choose to share the kind of data that we are referring to in this regard, otherwise it would be done freely and intentionally, and the secretive information gathering we are witnessing here would not be taking place. Even the information we do share “intentionally”, is done so for the most part by many of us who do not pay attention to, and truly consider the ramifications of the many disclaimers, license agreements, and privacy policies that we agree to on a daily basis. What we get in return, as you suggest, is far from a fair compromise.

This one-way “sharing” means that those who are in power have not only the ability to collect this information, but also the tools and the ability to analyse this data and generate statistics that the rest of us have no choice but to consume as facts. Aside from the ability to collect and “make sense of” the data, on our behalf – those in power also have the ability to limit and restrict infrastructure and resources in order to manipulate the “facts” at the source. For example, the ability to manipulate DNS or shut down ISPs to prevent the dissemination of data – effective censorship. Many people have been detained or persecuted (or worse) simply for “sharing” their thoughts and beliefs.

How can you make an anti-Orwellian argument, a case *for* “Big Brother”, and suggest that this kind of sharing can be good and benefit us all equally, when the vast amount of information we are talking about can be controlled from source to audience by such small percentage of the population? I suggest you pay attention the thoughts and many works of notable individuals such as Noam Chomsky, Glen Greenwald, and Lawrence Lessig, and perhaps reconsider your position on this matter. I am currently reading Greenwald’s latest book “With Liberty and Justice for Some: How the Law Is Used to Destroy Equality and Protect the Powerful”. I am sure you would find it most enlightening.

For those more visually/audibly inclined: “Noam Chomsky & Glenn Greenwald – With Liberty and Justice For Some”

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1nlRFbZvXI

What is the “Cloud”?

The “Cloud” Will Save Us!

You hear about it every day, “cloud services”, “cloud storage”, “the cloud as a platform”. But what is the “cloud” really? The definition of what the “cloud” is, is different for everyone.  Some believe it is the implementation of a certain group of technologies, such as web servers, virtual hosts, and GUI frameworks.  Others believe it is a philosophy for modern software development and implementations – in particular web-based and mobile implementations. Others still see the “cloud” as simply a way of out-sourcing infrastructure – yet still somehow see the need to have dedicated “Cloud Administrators”.

So what is the “Cloud” really?  I offer my humble opinion below.

In With Old, Out with the New

Virtualization has been around for a very long time, so has Software as a Service (SaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS).  These technologies have been with us in different forms and iterations since the time of X11.  Of course, these technologies have evolved significantly over time, but that does not make them revolutionary, merely evolutionary.

I keep hearing phrases and comments to the effect of “the cloud changes everything”, when in fact it really doesn’t.  It is simply another form of outsourcing.  The real benefit of todays’ “cloud” technology is that it makes (or seems to make) management of infrastructure easier.  But convenience always come with a price.

Easier? Maybe Not So Much.. Especially For Seasoned Professionals

The easier things are, the more often you are likely to do them.  If it becomes easier to deploy apps via Amazon EC2/S3, or to a DotCloud instance, then there is a strong likelihood your organization will deploy more of them.  Instead of managing infrastructure, you are now concerned with managing deployment practices, configuration standards, and code-bases. Not to mention the human resources required to maintain those applications going forward.

The infrastructure “problem” doesn’t go away, it’s just relocated – it’s now someone else’s problem.

Over-Reacting and Under-Utilizing

When organizations frantically down-size their teams in a drastic attempt to remain modern, it bothers me; saddens me really, because deep down I know that the new cloud-based technologies these organizations are hoping to take advantage of are simply re-iterations and re-implementations of the same technologies they’ve always had to deal with.  HTTP, CSS, SSH, and Linux, for example.  It is quite likely that most companies with significant IT resources already have people who are skilled enough to rip through the implementation of “cloud” technologies, armed only with their previous experiences, and the core “problem-solver” attitude that they’ve always had, that doesn’t go away with time.

“Not enough Cloud experience.” Really? Do you mean using a GUI web interface to setup a remote host?  Or perhaps you mean the command-line configuration that needs to be done to YAML formatted text files in order to get a Rails application up and running?  Of course old-hat Systems Administrators or Web-Application developers don’t know “precisely” how it all works – the first time around.  But after the effort is put in to get the application up and running, to document the setup and check it into version control, and to automate as much of the time-consuming or repetitive manual tasks as much as possible, the rest is, as they say, “cake”.  What you need to focus on is developing the kind of people who can do all of this, and have fun with it.  This is how you effectively re-train.  This is how you retain good talent.  You have to allow the people you have to show you they can adapt.  It is a waste of experience to let people go because their experience is not up-to-date.  That’s not their fault.

More Of The Same, Spot The Patterns

Newer scripting languages and frameworks are being hyped as if they can do things that have never been done before.  I’ve seen this with the likes of Ruby, Python, and Perl. Despite the fact that Perl has one of the largest, organized, stable, and well-tested libraries  of any programming language to date (the CPAN), it doesn’t get the same kind of love that newer languages like Ruby and Python do, especially in corporate environments.  Sometimes it in fact does pay to re-invent the wheel, but most often it does not.

In Conclusion

If you are still trying to figure out what the “cloud” really is, know that it is simply a string of technologies that have been around for a long time, re-branded to look new and cool (for marketing purposes), and bundled with some new management tools and remote storage to make things “easier”.

To sales and marketing folks, it could simply mean trendy and cool.  To developers, it may mean LAMP or MEAN.  To systems and infrastructure people it could mean hyper-visors, virtual machines, and software containers.  To DevOps folks, it may involve Puppet, Chef, and Ansible automations, or Continuous Integration.

To recruiters and hiring managers, it often means Amazon AWS and Spring Framework Experience.  And to end-users, it typically means anything they can access from all of their phones, laptops, tablets, and PCs simultaneously.

The “Cloud” means many things to many different people.  My humble opinion? At it’s core – at the heart of the all the technology and implementation that has made it all possible; are tools, software, and individual experience that have been around since the beginning, and it is ALL based on the concept of Open Communication, and the spirit and foundation of Free and Open-Source Software.

Just Another Perl Hacker

Sometimes writing small snippets of code can be meditative.

The other day, I realized that, even though I happen to be, among other things, Just Another Perl Hacker, I never bothered to write my own JAPH signature.  So I went ahead and wrote up a very simple (but effective) one.  Once it was complete, it dawned on me that other perl hackers may appreciate the ability to generate a signature like my own.

Since perl is all about code reuse and sharing, I figured I would write up a JAPH signature generator so that anyone can have an awesomely obfuscated JAPH signature like I do.

Firstly here’s my JAPH signature:

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$_='Kvtu!Bopuifs!Qfsm!Ibdlfs-!K/!Cpccz!Mpqf{';
@_=split//;foreach(@_){print chr(ord()-1)}

You can run the JAPH signature by copy/pasting it to a text file (e.g., japh_sig.pl), and running with

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perl japh_sig.pl

Which returns:

Just Another Perl Hacker, J. Bobby Lopez

You can also run the JAPH signature straight off the command line (with ‘perl -e’), but you have to replace the single quote characters in the string with double-quote characters, for example:

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perl -e '$_="Kvtu!Bopuifs!Qfsm!Ibdlfs-!K/!Cpccz!Mpqf{";@_=split//;foreach(@_){print chr(ord()-1)}'

This is all just for fun of course, but if you do end up using my JAPH signature generator, please let me know by sending me a quick message on Twitter to @jbobbylopez.

Have Fun!

The JAPH Signature Generator

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#!/usr/bin/env perl
##############################################
# USAGE:
#   perl japh.pl This is my awesome signature
#
# OUTPUT:
#   Your JAPH Signature:
#       $_='Uijt!jt!nz!bxftpnf!tjhobuvsf';
#       @_=split//;foreach(@_){print chr(ord()-1)} 
#
#   Returns:
#       This is my awesome signature
#
# AUTHOR: J. Bobby Lopez <jbl@jbldata.com>
##############################################
 
use feature say;
 
my $offset = 1;
my $signature = join (" ", @ARGV);
my $obfus_sig;
 
my @obfus = ();
my @sig = split //, $signature;
 
foreach my $c (@sig)
{
    push @obfus, ( chr ( ord($c) + $offset ) );
}
 
$obfus_sig = join ("", @obfus);
 
say <<"OUT";
 
Your JAPH Signature:
\t\$_='$obfus_sig';
\t\@_=split//;foreach(\@_){print chr(ord()-$offset)} 
 
OUT
print "Returns:\n\t";
@_=split//,$obfus_sig;foreach(@_){print chr(ord()-$offset)};
say;
1;

Please join us in welcoming the newest member of our family!

On January 28th, at around 5am EST, the newest member of our family was born.  Weighing in at around 6lbs 3oz, and just under 20 inches in length; our daughter, Phoebe Isabelle Lopez, arrived into our world.. and we couldn’t be more thrilled to have her!

20130207_154749 Phoebe

 

 

 

 

 

Phoebe has been a very good baby, getting lots of rest and food and exercise.  She loves to look at ceiling fans and the patterns on our curtains.  She doesn’t seem too interested in toys yet though.  Sandra has been singing songs to her all day, changing the lyrics to include Phoebe’s name in the song.  Somehow we always end up adding the word “poop” or “poo” to the lyrics.

There are so many things that you need to learn when becoming a new parent.  It takes a lot of patience most of all, but the world of “baby stuff” is truly a huge world unto it’s own.  I know stuff about diapers, creams, mixing formulas, changing the Diaper Genie “correctly” (using the bulit-in cutter, and not a pair of scissors), and I have mastered swaddling.

We are not getting a lot of sleep, and sometimes it’s not worth trying to get another 20 minutes before she cries, so we just go with the flow, and so far it’s been working.

Phoebe truly is a special soul, and a blessing to us.  We are very thankful to have her home safe, sound, and healthy!

More pictures soon!

Edit: More pictures here!

Flowers still hanging in there

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To my surprise the flowers we planted in early spring are still hanging in there!

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The last rainfall really helped a lot; it was starting to get pretty dry at one point earlier in the year.

Hopefully I”ll get a chance to rip out some weeds over the weekend.

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It”ll be sad to see them wither away in the fall :(

Be sure to enjoy the rest of your summer!

People Getting Along

It always surprises me when people share a bit more about themselves than they realize, especially those who think themselves fairly reserved, quiet, or “better than thou”.

I find this occurs when a big change has happened (or is happening) in that person’s life; a life-changing change. Sometimes these are the only moments when you get any kind of real insight into how that person thinks and reacts under pressure, or how they truly feel about the people and the issues in the world around them.

Experiences and Recorded History

It is amazing to me how far we have come technologically, yet we are still so far away from being able to record experiences with any degree of accuracy.  It is the experiences that we have that make us who we are, our identities.  And so it goes to reason that who we are can never be conveyed to another person or individual with any degree of accuracy.

There will always be gaps.. pieces of the puzzle missing so as to prevent anyone from seeing a clear picture of who you are, both inside and out.  The people around you the most will (should) have the fairest ideas about who you are overall; but even they woun’t have all the information.  There will always be little details about your personality, your dreams, and your fears that no one will ever be aware of, simply because they reside nowhere but within your own mind.

Are your feelings as important as those of others around you? Should they be?

Ever feel like you’re in a position to make a decision where there can be no reasonably useful or positive outcome?  Ever feel like the the choice in front of you will simply lead to misery (or at very least, be anti-climactic), regardless of the path you take?

We are all selfish in our own little (or not so little) ways.  We have all said, done, and been involved with things in the past that has shaped us into the individuals we are today.  Everyone at some point will regret some of the decisions they’ve made.  At the same time we understand that, in most cases, we would not have acquired the wisdom of experience gained by making those decisions in the first place.  Wisdom aside, we may never again have the opportunity to engage experiences we have always quietly longed for.

I, of course, am not a God fearing man by any means.  I don’t believe that chosing whether or not to consume pork or beef will have any major karmic consequence (aside from what can naturally occur health-wise if proper diet isn’t maintained).  I believe that whatever happens to us in our lives is the result of either a) the decisions we have made in the past, b) the decisions that others have made which happen to affect us by consequence, or c) cascading events over time, including genetics and environmental changes. Any moral conflicts which stir in my mind are the result of my own experiences and what I’ve come to see as good, bad, or taboo.

Having said that, “let your conscience be your guide” becomes a double-edged sword. Taking your own feelings into account is just as important as taking into account the feelings and wishes of others (isn’t it?).  One day you may find that the very thing you’ve avoided in order to “do the right thing” – to be the best model of a good person that you can be (from the perspective of your current society/environment),  could very well end up being your biggest regret.

There is of course a significant portion of our population that, by default, will put their own feelings first, before the feelings of others.  Lets call this group the “me first” group.  This type of person will consider the feelings of others as an after-thought, and usually in a reactive manner, should their general lack of consideration put them in an uncomfortable situation.

I am not one to be inconsiderate of the feelings of others.. for the most part.

On the flip-side, there are those who feel that their desires and feelings should always be considered first, in any situation.  I guess these people also fall squarely into the “me first” group.  Many of these people have a knack for twisting culture, tradition and social norms to support their “me first” mind-set.

But isn’t making your own feelings an equal or greater priority over the feelings of others place you in the “me first” group as well?  It depends.

It’s all about patterns – how often do you do it? How regularly does it occur? To what extent? I would imagine that the “me first” group are “me first” people most, if not all of the time.  Whereas, those who have to consciously think about putting their own feelings first – who generally put others first, and themselves second (or last) don’t necessarily get lumped into the “me first” group.  Of course, a single selfish action can cause you to be labelled one way or the other.  I suppose also, over time, people can shift in and out of the “me first” group depending on their current life situation.

But anyone capable of using the space between their ears can understand the difference between an intermittent, irregular behavior, and that of behavior which is regular, recurring, and often predictable.

So.. does a selfish act committed by a generally un-selfish person, make that person generally selfish?  Everyone is selfish to some degree.  Understood.  However there are extremes that need to be taken into account, extremes that most people cannot (or will not) acknowledge.  Practical wisdom to the rescue.