Category Archives: This is Big

Our Galaxy is a Seed that Will Eventually Grow into it’s Own Universe

The universe is accelerating away from the center of the Big Bang.

The universe is cooling down, because galaxies are moving away from each other.
The number of stars in the sky will diminish over time, there will eventually be a few, then there will be none. This is the current theory (paraphrased) held by many scientists today, typically referred to as heat death.

I’m no scientist, but I like to visualize.  Read this article: Speculative Sunday: Can a Black Hole Explode?

I was inspired, in particular by this image:

This artist’s impression shows the remains of a star that came too close to a supermassive black hole. Extremely sharp observations of the event Swift J1644+57 with the radio telescope network EVN (European VLBI Network) have revealed a remarkably compact jet, shown here in yellow. – ESA/S. Komossa/Beabudai Design

 

The above image is an artists rendition of the results of the data received from an “earth-sized radio telescope”. The detail is specific, even if interpreted. What I’m seeing here is a pattern. Spiral falling / contraction (gravity), with a projection of stuff out the north and south poles. This projection from the black hole is likely directly related to the consumption of the star, which we see visualised as the star being smeared in a spiral around the singularity.

This is the pattern. Gravity pulls things in on one “plane” and creates a jet stream at the north and south poles of the black hole.  The jet stream is comprised of particles of matter that have been deflected or have narrowly escaped being captured by the black whole, only to be accelerated away at high speed again.   Now this particular aspect of how black holes function is very interesting because the process heats up space, to the point where it could potentially create or influence the creation of stars within a galaxy.  Think about that for a moment.

To create a star, or star-system, you don’t need THE Big Bang.  You don’t need super-galaxies, or galaxies or star-systems.  What you need is a black hole.  Every star that dies turns into a black hole (or a neutron star, then a black hole).You just need a black hole to create a star, and planets, and there I suggest, life?

My hypothesis is this.  Even if all our galaxies are moving away from each other over billions of years, and even though light and heat will diminish – new stars, new galaxies, and new universes will be created, just as the “first” one was.  And this dimension will continue on for other new life forms to grow and learn and figure this all out all over again.

Watch Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey if you have no idea what I’m talking about, then come back to this article.

http://www.space.com/18893-black-hole-jets-similarities.html
http://www.thephysicsmill.com/2015/06/14/speculative-sunday-can-a-black-hole-explode/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutron_star

Note: After writing this, I read up on Hawking Radiation, and found that black holes do die if they don’t feed (on other stars), they will eventually evaporate.  This is kind of poetic.

Why is my daughter strong? I didn’t clip her wings: Ziauddin Yousafzai at TED2014

Related article: Why is my daughter strong? I didn’t clip her wings: Ziauddin Yousafzai at TED2014

From the article:

In October 2012, a Taliban-affiliated gunman shot Ziauddin Yousafzai’s daughter Malala soon after she boarded a bus en route to her school. In Swat, Pakistan — where Ziauddin and Malala live — the Taliban had outlawed all girls from attending school — but Yousafzai, an educator and steadfast crusader for women’s rights in Pakistan, refused to take Malala out of his school.

Stephen Colbert Interviews Neil deGrasse Tyson at Montclair Kimberley Academy – 2010-Jan-29

Cross-post from LinkedIn, in response to Stephen Hawking: Black Holes May Not Have ‘Event Horizons’ After All:

So relevant: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXh9RQCvxmg Stephen Colbert interviews Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson. The entire interview (starts about 6 mins in) is just a wholly wonderful discussion. I wish more people would watch it, over and over again. Dr. Tyson tries to elaborate on the very same topic (current understanding of black holes). Simply engrossing and inspiring. The interview is long, but the elaboration of black holes starts about 1hr 6 mins into the video. Enjoy!

Please join us in welcoming the newest member of our family!

On January 28th, at around 5am EST, the newest member of our family was born.  Weighing in at around 6lbs 3oz, and just under 20 inches in length; our daughter, Phoebe Isabelle Lopez, arrived into our world.. and we couldn’t be more thrilled to have her!

20130207_154749 Phoebe

 

 

 

 

 

Phoebe has been a very good baby, getting lots of rest and food and exercise.  She loves to look at ceiling fans and the patterns on our curtains.  She doesn’t seem too interested in toys yet though.  Sandra has been singing songs to her all day, changing the lyrics to include Phoebe’s name in the song.  Somehow we always end up adding the word “poop” or “poo” to the lyrics.

There are so many things that you need to learn when becoming a new parent.  It takes a lot of patience most of all, but the world of “baby stuff” is truly a huge world unto it’s own.  I know stuff about diapers, creams, mixing formulas, changing the Diaper Genie “correctly” (using the bulit-in cutter, and not a pair of scissors), and I have mastered swaddling.

We are not getting a lot of sleep, and sometimes it’s not worth trying to get another 20 minutes before she cries, so we just go with the flow, and so far it’s been working.

Phoebe truly is a special soul, and a blessing to us.  We are very thankful to have her home safe, sound, and healthy!

More pictures soon!

Edit: More pictures here!

ACTA is part of a multi-decade, worldwide copyright campaign

Ars Technica recently talked to Michael Geist, a legal scholar at the University of Ottawa, about this effort. He told us that rather than making their arguments at the World Intellectual Property Organization, where they would be subject to serious public scrutiny, the US and other supporters of more restrictive copyright law have increasingly focused on pushing their agenda in alternative venues, such as pending trade deals, where negotiations are secret and critics are excluded.

Read the full article at ArsTechnica.

UK Government To Demand Data On Every Call And Email

[techweekeurope.co.uk] UK Government To Demand Data On Every Call And Email

Plans could force ISPs and phone operators to hand over records on all phone calls, emails, Tweets and Facebook messages

[telegraph.co.uk] Phone and email records to be stored in new spy plan

Details of every phone call and text message, email traffic and websites visited online are to be stored in a series of vast databases under new Government anti-terror plans.

This story also made the Slashdot front page.

Canadian government is ‘muzzling its scientists’

An article talking about the issue of climate change research, and how governments may be actively preventing the findings from reaching the general public.

“I suspect the federal government would prefer that its scientists don’t discuss research that points out just how serious the climate change challenge is.”

This reminds me of the pseudo documentary “The Age of Stupid” that discusses the many ways that humanity has been warned about the quickly approaching dangers of climate change.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZjsJdokC0s

 

[Quote] Alan Watts on the difference between where we are, and where we are going..

“… To most of us living today, all these fantasies of the future seem most objectionable: the loss of privacy and freedom, the restriction of travel, and the progressive conversion of flesh and blood, wood and stone, fruit and fish, sight and sound, into plastic, synthetic, and electronic reproductions. Increasingly, the artist and musician puts himself out of business through making ever more faithful and inexpensive reproductions of his original works. Is reproduction in this sense to replace biological reproduction, through cellular fission or sexual union? In short, is the next step in evolution to be the transformation of man into nothing more than electronic patterns?”

” All these eventualities may seem so remote as to be unworthy of concern. Yet in so many ways they are already with us, and, as we have seen, the speed of technical and social change accelerates more than we like to admit. The popularity of science-fiction attests to a very widespread fascination with such questions, and so much science-fiction is in fact a commentary on the present, since one of the best ways of understanding what goes on today is to extend it into tomorrow. What is the difference between what is happening, on the one hand, and the direction of its motion, on the other? If I am flying from London to New York, I am moving westwards even before leaving the British Coast.”

– From: The Book.. On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are, by Alan W. Watts,  First Collier Books Edition 1967

New drug could cure nearly any viral infection

Most bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics such as penicillin, discovered decades ago. However, such drugs are useless against viral infections, including influenza, the common cold, and deadly hemorrhagic fevers such as Ebola.

Now, in a development that could transform how viral infections are treated, a team of researchers at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory has designed a drug that can identify cells that have been infected by any type of virus, then kill those cells to terminate the infection.

In a paper published July 27 in the journal PLoS One, the researchers tested their drug against 15 viruses, and found it was effective against all of them — including rhinoviruses that cause the common cold, H1N1 influenza, a stomach virus, a polio virus, dengue fever and several other types of hemorrhagic fever.

The drug works by targeting a type of RNA produced only in cells that have been infected by viruses. “In theory, it should work against all viruses,” says Todd Rider, a senior staff scientist in Lincoln Laboratory’s Chemical, Biological, and Nanoscale Technologies Group who invented the new technology.

Because the technology is so broad-spectrum, it could potentially also be used to combat outbreaks of new viruses, such as the 2003 SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) outbreak, Rider says.

Other members of the research team are Lincoln Lab staff members Scott Wick, Christina Zook, Tara Boettcher, Jennifer Pancoast and Benjamin Zusman…[ Full Article ]