Tag Archives: Open Source

rbenv and multiple local ruby version installs (like perlbrew)

When I was using perl as my primary development language, I had a platform of tools in place to make my perl development fun and productive. This included tools like Perl::Dancer, DBIx::Class, cpanm, and perlbrew. Perlbrew was a tool I used to maintain multiple versions of perl in my local development environment, so that I could test my code against multiple perl and module versions to ensure that it worked on the largest range of platforms ( and to avoid dependency related bugs ).

This allowed me to run my code against Perl 5.10, 5.12, and 5.14, and so on each with their own module-base, fully isolated from each-other.

Now I’m working with many different tools these days, and haven’t had the opportunity to work with other languages to the extent that I’ve worked with Perl, but I have been playing with Ruby and Golang. Using Ruby, I immediately thought that I would like to play with multiple versions of Ruby without altering the ‘system’ ruby on my workstation. A quick search of ‘perlbrew for ruby’ lead me to rbenv which seems to be exactly what I was looking for.

Some examples of how rbenv works:

# list all available versions:
$ rbenv install -l
 
# install a Ruby version:
$ rbenv install 2.0.0-p247
 
# Sets a local application-specific Ruby version by writing the version name to a .ruby-version file in the current directory.
$ rbenv local 1.9.3-p327
 
# Sets the global version of Ruby to be used in all shells by writing the version name to the ~/.rbenv/version file.
$ rbenv global 1.8.7-p352
 
# Sets a shell-specific Ruby version by setting the RBENV_VERSION environment variable in your shell
$ rbenv shell jruby-1.7.1
 
# Lists all Ruby versions known to rbenv, and shows an asterisk next to the currently active version.
$ rbenv versions 1.8.7-p352 1.9.2-p290 * 1.9.3-p327 (set by /Users/sam/.rbenv/version) jruby-1.7.1 rbx-1.2.4 ree-1.8.7-2011.03
 
# Displays the currently active Ruby version, along with information on how it was set.
$ rbenv version 1.9.3-p327 (set by /Users/sam/.rbenv/version)
 
# Displays the full path to the executable that rbenv will invoke when you run the given command.
$ rbenv which irb
/Users/sam/.rbenv/versions/1.9.3-p327/bin/irb

The Apache Software Foundation Celebrates the 17th Anniversary of the Apache HTTP Server with the release of v2.4

World’s most popular Web Server powers nearly 400 million Websites across the globe

Numerous enhancements make Apache HTTP Server v2.4 ideally suited for Cloud environments. They include:
•    Improved performance (lower resource utilization and better concurrency)
•    Reduced memory usage
•    Asyncronous I/O support
•    Dynamic reverse proxy configuration
•    Performance on par, or better, than pure event-driven Web servers
•    More granular timeout and rate/resource limiting capability
•    More finely-tuned caching support, tailored for high traffic servers and proxies.

Read the full press release at The Apache Foundation’s blog.

Work on CPAN-API and Perl Modules Indexing

Since the last TPM meeting in October, some of the TPM members have been working diligently to improve the CPAN search experience by re-architecting CPAN search from the bottom up. I’ve joined the design team in the hopes of providing the Perl community a much more improved CPAN experience.

As most Perl developers are aware, search.cpan.org is great for finding useful libraries and modules, but horrible at providing any significant information which relates modules to each-other, or providing useful meta-information or statistics which can be used to make better decisions on which modules to use, let alone deploy in a production environment.

If you are interested in taking part in the CPAN-API community project, please contact me, or visit the CPAN-API project site on GitHub.

CPAN-API: https://github.com/CPAN-API/cpan-api/wiki/
Toronto Perl Mongers: http://to.pm.org/

WebCalendar – An Open Source Shared Calendar Solution

Two years ago, I discussed a shared calendar solution called Monket Calendar. In the discussion I mentioned that I was considering Monket Calendar as an alternative to PHP iCalendar, which was another (read-only) web based calendar solution I was using at the time.

I no longer use PHP iCalendar, and I haven’t since looked at Monket Calendar. The only calendering solution that I use now, and that has all the features I need, is the absolutely wonderful WebCalendar by k5n.

Continue reading WebCalendar – An Open Source Shared Calendar Solution